Maria-Theresa C. Okafor, Sociology and Anthropology, Speaks at NIH

4D4A0646Dr. Maria-Theresa C. Okafor, Sociology and Anthropology and Center for Aging Studies, was a guest speaker during the opening plenary session of the 2014 Professional Development and Data Systems workshop held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from July 24-25.

Dr. Okafor, a Clinical Gerontologist and Epidemiologist specializing in health in the African Diaspora, discussed her research using national data from the New Immigrant Survey and the successes and challenges in translating quantitative research for policymakers to improve immigrant health and well-being. The two-day workshop sponsored by the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools (HSHPS), aimed to help prepare scholars interested in Hispanic health research strengthen their skills and knowledge to perform analytical studies of national and state health datasets to better contribute to Hispanic health care research and provision of adequate health care to Hispanics and other underserved populations.

Safety Workshop for Researchers Traveling Abroad (8/26)

Do you take your personal or UMBC issued electronics (laptops, telephones, tablets) when traveling? Have you been invited to lecture or collaborate with a university outside the US? What protections should you follow?

Come meet and listen to an expert from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to discuss general awareness and travel precautions to take when traveling abroad to protect you and your research. The workshop will be held on August 26, 2014 from 11 A.M.- 12.30 P.M. in bwtech@UMBC North, Suite 310. Registration ends August 20, 2014.

Click here to register and learn more.

Yonathan Zohar, NPR’s Morning Edition, Father of Bluefin Tuna

Yonathan Zohar, professor of marine biotechnology, was recently featured on NPR’s Morning Edition for his success in keeping, as Dan Charles of NPR says, “the tiger of the ocean,” bluefin tuna larvae alive for 10 days.

“It’s amazing. We cannot stop looking at them! We are here around the clock and we are looking at them, because it is so beautiful,” says Yonathan Zohar.

Charles says, “The fish can grow to 1,000 pounds. They can swim up to 45 miles per hour and cross entire oceans.”

To learn more about this remarkable research:

Listen to the story

Niels Van Tomme, CADVC, Named Curator of the 7th Bucharest Biennale

nielsvt_web1Niels Van Tomme, Visiting Curator of the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, has been named Curator of the 7th Bucharest Biennale (Bucharest International Biennial for Contemporary Art), to take place May 26 to July 17, 2016.

The Bucharest Biennale is interested in exploring links between creative practice and social progress, as well as correspondences between local and global contexts. Now in its tenth year, the Biennale continues to build a strong partnership between Bucharest—a geocultural space where the political is reflected in all aspects of life—and the rest of the world. In transcending specific geographical, historical, or political frameworks, it connects to a broader complexity, namely the one of “resistance” within the quotidian realm.

More information about the Biennale is available on its website.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in the New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, examines Dawoud Bey’s intimate and powerful 2007 portrait of Barack Obama prior to becoming president. The essay is being co-published by the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art. “The photograph depicts its famously private and introspective subject only months before he was to step into the abyss of presidential politics. And it defines him free of the stereotypes and myths that have come to characterize his presidency,” observers Berger.

Read “Meditation on President Obama’s Portrait” and view the photograph at the New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column has featured several essays centered upon race and photography, including Malcolm X as image maker, Ken Gonzales-Day, images of emancipation, the photographs of Deborah Will, and the civil rights work of James Karales.