CSEE Faculty Involved With NSF’s CS10K Teacher Training Project

 

 

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CSEE’s Marie desJardins is currently collaborating with Maryland educators and researchers for the NSF-funded CS10K Teacher Training Project. The project seeks to change how computer science is taught by high school teachers. Researchers work together with high school teachers to craft new curricula for high school computer science programs. This project is unique in that actual high school teachers are creating the new curricula, rather than professional curriculum writers. The CS10K Maryland Project team includes faculty from UMCP, as well as high school teachers from Charles County and Baltimore County.

The CS10K team has facilitated the creation of “a complete curriculum package for a new College Board Advanced Placement (AP) course called CS Principles.” Originally, the goal of the CS10K team was to train 10,000 teachers to teach computer science in 10,000 schools nationwide. The project has been revised to reflect its new goal of training teachers in all U.S. schools.

In academia there is a growing concern that females–as well as minorities and those with disabilities–are being repeatedly discouraged from pursuing programming in high school. Professor desJardins is trying to change this by directing the CS Matters in MD Project. (CS Matters in MD is part of the larger, NSF-supported initiative known as CS 10K.)

“I believe that CS should be included throughout the K-12 curriculum as a set of basic skills and knowledge for today’s world,” desJardins said. “All citizens of the 21st century, especially the next generation of knowledge workers, will benefit greatly from learning about computational thinking and the problem-solving skills that are a core part of computer science.”

In addition, desJardins explains that, “We need to expand the pool of available workers to fill the many computing-related jobs that our economy demands, and in order to be sure that the technology we develop is robust and useful, we need to increase the diversity of the computer scientists who take those jobs.  To meet these goals, we must broaden our notion of what it means to teach computer science (beyond just teaching coding skills), and we must reach a broader audience at an earlier age.  Our ‘CS Matters in Maryland’ project is particularly focused on creating appealing and engaging curriculum materials for the newly announced AP CS Principles course, and on training teachers to deliver this material effectively to a diverse population of learners.”

More information about CS Matters in Maryland and the CS10K Project can be found here.

This article was reposted from the CSEE Web site.

Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, on CBC Radio

Illuminating Childhood Ellen Handler SpitzOn December 19, Honors College Professor Ellen Handler Spitz participated in a discussion on CBC Radio on “The Secret Lives of Children.” The segment centered around the idea that advances in technology combined with a strong focus on achievement can often suppress creativity, and children’s imagination can be a strong shield against cultural confinements.

During the segment, Spitz says that high tech toys should be traded in favor of letting children explore their inner worlds: “I think that children, when we allow them to make believe, this kind of vision and this kind of connecting…we should treasure it and not stamp it out.”

Spitz’s most recent research focuses on children’s aesthetic lives, and she has authored six books on the arts and psychology: “Art and Psyche” (Yale); “Image and Insight” (Columbia); “Museums of the Mind” (Yale); “Inside Picture Books” (Yale); “The Brightening Glance” (Pantheon); and “Illuminating Childhood” (Michigan). She most recently published “Magritte’s Labyrinth,” a new e-book which analyzes the artwork of Belgian Surrealist artist René Magritte.

To listen to the full segment on CBC Radio, click here.

Roy Meyers, Political Science, on MarylandReporter.com

Roy Meyers (UMBC)In a December 15 column published on MarylandReporter.com, Political Science Professor Roy Meyers shared his thoughts on why there are no easy budget fixes in Maryland. He responded to an earlier column written by Barry Rascovar which outlined potential solutions to solving state budget deficits.

Meyers addressed state revenue estimates, adjusting the start time of the fiscal year, and sweeping under-projected revenues into the state’s surplus, all of which were discussed in Rascovar’s column.

“It’s important to remember that just as with budgets, for the budget process there is no such thing as an ‘easy fix,'” Meyers wrote in his column.

To read the full article titled “No easy budget fixes; Rascovar’s proposals to change the fiscal year are way off base,” click here.

BLS for the Healthcare Provider (2/24)

Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Provider will be held on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 from 5:30-10:00 pm. This course is open to the general public. The registration fee for the provider course is $85 which includes the manual. The BLS renewal course is $70. Interested persons may download a registration fee from the following website: http://ehspace.umbc.edu

Inquires should be directed to Danette McCoy at 410-455-3584 or danette@umbc.edu.

Basic Life Support Instructor Training (2/28)

Basic Life Support for Instructor training will be held on Saturday, February 28, 2015 from 8:00 am -4:00 pm. This course is open to anyone who is interested in learning to teach CPR. Registrants must have a current BLS card. The registration fee for the course is $200 which includes the manual. Interested persons may download a registration fee from the Emergency Health Services website.

Inquires should be directed to Danette McCoy at 410-455-3584 or danette@umbc.edu.

Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor Training (3/21)

Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor training will be held on Saturday, March 21, 2015 from 8:00 am -4:00 pm. This course is open to anyone who is interested in learning to teach ACLS. Registrants must have a current ACLS card. The registration fee for the course is $300 which includes the course materials and manual. Interested persons may download a registration fee on the Emergency Health Services website.

Inquires should be directed to Danette McCoy at 410-455-3584 or danette@umbc.edu.

Student Profile Sharing Launches

UMBCUMBC now allows students the ability to electronically share grades and class schedule information with others. This new feature, “Profile Sharing”, will allow the sharing of information such as grades with family members, and class schedule with study group members.

Please note: This feature does not give parents and other designees the right to receive student information from faculty, staff or other members of the campus community; federal law (FERPA) guides when we can disclose the student records that we maintain. This capability simply empowers the student to more readily share the records they choose to disclose.

For more information about FERPA, visit the Registrar’s webpage on the Privacy and Release of Education Records. For additional questions and clarification around FERPA, contact UMBC’s Office of the General Counsel. For more information about profile sharing, visit our profile sharing FAQs.