Eric Dyer, Visual Arts, Exhibits “Copenhagen Cycles” in New York

CphCycles_Polser-zoeEric Dyer, Visual Arts, will be featured in a solo exhibition at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York. His work Copenhagen Cycles: 2006 – 2014 will be on display from September 6 through October 11, with an opening reception on September 6 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Information is available at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts. The exhibition received a preview article on August 15 in Wall Street International.

Thomas Sayre’s “Forum” in the News

Forum by Thomas Sayre, under construction. (Photo: Timothy Nohe)

Forum by Thomas Sayre, under construction. (Photo: Timothy Nohe)

Forum, the public artwork by Thomas Sayre being constructed in front of the Performing Arts and Humanities Building, has been covered by local papers in North Carolina, where the “earth cast” columns were fabricated:

August 12, NewsObserver.com – First Look: Raleigh sculptor Thomas Sayre – with video here.

August 13, North Raleigh New – North Raleigh seniors dig unearthed art.

 

Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape (8/27)

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Victoria Sambunaris
Untitled (Potash Mine – distant view, Wendover, Utah), 2004
Chromogenic Print
Courtesy of the artist

Opening Wednesday, August 27, at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, is the exhibition Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape.

This exhibition presents photographs made over the span of more than a decade by photographer Victoria Sambunaris as she traversed the United States, stopping to photograph phenomena ubiquitous and familiar to particular regions but anomalous to the ordinary eye: massive distribution facilities, complex transport systems, colossal mining operations, majestic mountain gaps, exploding mud pots. Acting as both document and metaphor for the American experience, Sambunaris’s photographs bring into view the vast, open-ended mystery and unease of a country where human intervention and natural beauty inspire wonder in equal measure. Collected ephemera—the essential, and incidental, elements of Sambunaris’s work as a photographer and researcher—are also included in this exhibition (books on geology and history, maps, and artifacts collected on her journeys, such as mineral specimens, journals, road logs), as well as a video documenting her travel and work processes, and over 1,500 of her small photographic sketches. [Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Photography.]

The exhibition will continue through December 17. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Thursday until 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 12 – 5 p.m.  Admission is free. For more information call 410-455-2270.

The artist will deliver a public lecture on her work on Wednesday, October 8 at 4:00 p.m.: http://artscalendar.umbc.edu/2011/06/23/victoria-sambunaris-artist-lecture/

More information: http://artscalendar.umbc.edu/2011/07/30/victoria-sambunaris-taxonomy-of-a-landscape/

Tom Lagana, Music, in Capital Gazette

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Tom Lagana – Photo by Larry Melton

Tom Lagana, Music, was interviewed for a feature article in the Capital Gazette on his forthcoming third album, Volume 1. “It’s called Volume 1 because it’s the first record I’m playing all nylon string,” the guitarist told the Capital Gazette.

Also featured on the recording is electric bass play Tom Baldwin, an affiliate artist in the Department of Music.

Click here to read the full story, published on Monday, August 25.

Irene Chan, Visual Arts and Asian Studies, in Women’s Studio Workshop Spotlight

Irene Chan, Visual Arts and Asian Studies, is featured in an interview published by Women’s Studio Workshop (WSW), an arts center she first visited back in 1996 as a studio intern. She speaks about the development of her artwork, her use of materials, and her projects about racial and cultural identity. Read the interview here on WSW’s website.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in The New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, shares his take on the thousands of photographs flooding out of Ferguson, Missouri. “Historically, photography was integral to the fight against racism and segregation. Leaders from Sojourner Truth to Malcolm X embraced the photograph’s potential as evidence and its ability to combat stereotypes,” writes Berger. “But sometimes, as in Ferguson, the camera has served as a more spontaneous ‘weapon of choice,’ as the photographer Gordon Parks called it, wielded by the oppressed in moments of anger, fear or frustration.”

Read “In Ferguson, Photographs as Powerful Agents” and view the photographs at The New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column, which appears monthly on The New York Times website, is “a continuing exploration of the relationship of race to photographic portrayals of race.”

Linda Dusman, Music, and Eric Smallwood, Visual Art, Awarded TEDCO MII Grant

Symphony Interactive Screen

Symphony Interactive Screen

Linda Dusman, Music, and Eric Smallwood, Visual Arts, in partnership with the School of Music at the University of Maryland, College Park, have received a $150,000 Maryland Innovation Initiative (MII) grant for their work on the tablet app, Symphony Interactive. MII was created as a partnership between the State of Maryland and five Maryland academic research institutions (Johns Hopkins University; Morgan State University; UMCP; University of Maryland Baltimore; and UMBC), and is managed by TEDCO, created by the Maryland State Legislature in 1998 to facilitate the transfer and commercialization of technology from Maryland’s research universities and federal labs into the marketplace. The MII program promotes the commercialization of academic research conducted in the partnership universities. Symphony Interactive is only the second project within the humanities ever to receive an award from MII, and the first to be funded in the arts and humanities at UMBC.

SI_CommaderControlSymphony Interactive provides contemporary audiences a novel way to engage with live orchestral performances. Through both text and images presented through a unique interface at the exact moment the information is most pertinent to the music, SI enables an enriched experience for users by allowing them to learn about the music and its cultural history during its performance. Acting as an informed “friend,” the app subtly provides information to enhance engagement, keeping the experience of the live performance paramount. During the grant period, the SI team will create a library for thirty of the most performed orchestral works, producing unique textual and visual information for each piece. Over the next nine months, the grant funding also will enable developing a more fully featured proof of concept application, expanding the social media extensions of the app, and performing valuable market research to aid in the commercialization process.

The Symphony Interactive project has been in development since 2011, with support from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and the Office of the Vice President for Research. Development has progressed through collaboration with many faculty, staff and students from Music, Visual Arts, the Imaging Research Center, Human Centered Computing, and the Department of Information Technology. Symphony Interactive has been tested in performances by the UMBC Symphony, and most recently at the National Orchestra Institute at the Clarice Smith Center for the Performing Arts.