Roy Meyers, Political Science, on MarylandReporter.com

In an op-ed published July 24 on MarylandReporter.com, Political Science Professor Roy Meyers writes about a proposed bill that would allow U.S. corporations to avoid taxes when they repatriate profits that are now booked overseas, if they purchase bonds that would be used to build infrastructure.

Roy Meyers (UMBC)

In his column, Meyers writes that the bill deserves scrutiny, noting: “[the bill] would create the American Infrastructure Fund (AIF) and capitalize it with up to $50 billion. That money would be used to finance infrastructure projects that pass benefit-cost tests.”

He adds, “the projects would be expected to pay the AIF back, meaning that the infrastructure projects most likely to be financed through the AIF would be those where it would easy to charge tolls. The AIF is thus somewhat duplicative of the existing Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program, and like various proposals to create an ‘infrastructure bank.’ Assuming that the bank would spend $10 billion a year for five years, it would add a small amount of funding for federal investment.”

To read Meyer’s full column on MarylandReporter.com, click here.

Leslie Morgan, Sociology and Anthropology, in The Baltimore Beacon

An article published in the August 2014 edition of The Baltimore Beacon newspaper examines the struggles and challenges caregivers can face while caring for elderly family members. The article covers topics ranging from finding support and treatment for caregivers’ own health to caregiver stress and benefits.

Leslie Morgan

Leslie Morgan, professor of sociology and co-director of the UMBC/UMB Ph.D. program in gerontology, was interviewed for the article and said the subject of caregiver stress has been a focus of research for almost three decades.

“This is a time when you and your loved can be together and get closer,” Morgan said, “when hopefully, you’ll have the time to say things you might not otherwise have said, and to show your affection for each other.”

You can read the complete article titled, “Ups and downs of caregiving,” by clicking here.

Nicole King, American Studies, in City Paper

Nicole King, an associate professor of American studies, recently published an essay as part of an ongoing series in the “City Folk” section of City Paper profiling UMBC graduate student Chanan Delivuk. King met Delivuk through her work in the Filbert Street Community Garden in Curtis Bay earlier this year.

Delivuk is a community gardener and artist who uses new media to explore everyday stories in her art practice. The profile describes Delivuk growing up in the Curtis Bay neighborhood and how it provided a strong sense of place for her as she left town to go to college and eventually graduate school. King writes about Delivuk developing an interest in art while in college and her planned trip to Croatia this summer to further explore her Croatian heritage.

The compelling profile ends with a powerful quote from Delivuk as she is describing her home of Curtis Bay: “I will always live here because I love it so much,” she says. “I want to walk out on a busy street, with sirens going off, and people walking, and a lot going on. There’s something about this city that’s so unique.”

To read King’s full article in City Paper titled, “Conservation Artist: Chanan Delivuk has deep roots in Curtis Bay,” click here.

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, Op-Ed in The Baltimore Sun

Tom SchallerIn his latest column in The Baltimore Sun, Political Science Professor Thomas Schaller writes about American small businesses competing against multinational corporations. In his column titled, “A fairer (small) business environment,” Schaller argues that small businesses face a competitive disadvantage because they are “politically overmatched against multinational corporate giants.”

He adds, “the Democrats’ strong union ties tend to complicate their relationship with business generally, even if the party is increasingly dependent upon corporate campaign donations. And if the Democrats might be described as a partially-owned subsidiary of corporate America, consider the Republicans a wholly-owned franchise.”

To read the full article published July 22 in The Baltimore Sun, click here.

Paul Smith, Chemistry, in The Baltimore Sun

The Baltimore Sun reported on the Mid-Atlantic Nanonscience Education Hub internship program, which allows students from the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) to participate in nanoscience and nanotechnology internships at UMBC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Morgan State University and the Fab Lab in Catonsville.

Paul Smith, associate professor of chemistry, coordinates the internship program, which offers students exposure to a four-year institution, research experience and improved job prospects. “Part of our mission as a state institution is to promote education and to provide opportunities for students for better employment,” he said. “Certainly we also have an obligation as a Maryland state institution to do anything we can to help improve the economy if we can.”

Several CCBC students who are participating in the program will attend UMBC in the fall.

Click here to read the article in The Baltimore Sun and here to find out more about the program.

Pres. Hrabowski Discusses ACE Fellows Program in “Diverse”

A recent article about the American Council on Higher Education (ACE) Fellows Program in the publication Diverse: Issues in Higher Education quotes President Hrabowski. The ACE Fellows Program seeks to prepare college leaders for senior-level positions in higher education. The program has been successful in increasing the number of minority and women presidents in colleges and universities.

Dr. Hrabowski has participated in the program as a mentor, training administrators like Dr. Jack Thomas, who is now president of Western Illinois University. Dr. Hrabowski praised the mission of the program, calling it “one of those rare opportunities in American higher education that focuses on experiences that can broaden a future leader.”

Click here to read the article.

LA Times: Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light, Tom Cronin and Michael Bok

“When you look at a mantis shrimp, you see a vivid lobster-like crustacean whose forearms can strike with the force of a .22-caliber bullet. But when a mantis shrimp looks at you, we have no idea what it sees. That’s because the mantis shrimp possesses one of the most complex eyeballs on the planet, an organ that allows it to perceive a rainbow of colors in both the visible and ultraviolet spectrum without the massive brainpower required for human vision,” so writes Julia Rosen of the Los Angeles Times.

Rosen’s story, Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light, tells of Tom Cronin and Michael Bok’s paper. Cronin is a professor of biology and Bok a graduate student who has now moved on to a post doc at Lund University.

The paper, which was recently published in the journal, Current Biology, reported that, “that that mantis shrimp use a set of filters to separate ultraviolet light into discrete colors that get picked up by the animals’ photoreceptors.”

U.S. News, Colleges Work to Engage Women, Minorities in STEM Fields, Penny Rheingans

Delece Smith-Barrow of U.S. News & World Report, recently wrote about the importance of engaging women and minorities in STEM fields. Smith-Barrow interviewed UMBC’s Penny Rheingans, director for the Center of Women in Technology (CWIT).

Smith Barrow wrote: “If students struggle in class and have few peers and faculty that look like them, it’s easy for them to think, “maybe I’m not supposed to be here, either,” says Penny Rheingans, director for the Center for Women in Technology at the University of Maryland—Baltimore County.

Prospective college students who are women or underrepresented minorities can determine if a school can help them in their STEM endeavors by finding out what resources colleges offer these kinds of students.

The Center for Women in Technology at UMBC​ provides mentoring services, ​seminars that discuss topics such as networking and time management and a number of other resources, Rheingans says. A living and learning residence community provided through the program caters to women and men in STEM, but the former group dominates.

“Eighty-five percent of students who live on our floor are women,” she says.

Rheingan encourages prospective students to keep an eye out for school environments that have structures in place that support women. “You’re looking for a community,” she says. Visiting the college and talking to current students is one way to find out about the community, she says.”

 

 

Say Something: Jesse Smith

The Chronicle has just featured math major and Meyerhoff Scholar Jesse Smith in their Say Something audio series.

Smith talks about his experience with the Meyerhoff program and how peer
connections through the program have given him a sense of confidence and
what is possible to achieve in his career. The article also links to the
HHMI story about the Meyerhoff Replication Project.

President Hrabowski in Chronicle of Higher Education “On Leadership” Video Interview

The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s Sara Lipka speaks with President Freeman Hrabowski in a new video interview that focuses on how universities can help students succeed.

Dr. Hrabowski discusses the success and replication of the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, as well as similar programs across the disciplines, including the arts, humanities and social sciences. He emphasizes the importance of helping students build supportive peer communities and learn to collaborate with one another.

“We believe the work should be very rigorous, whether in literature or in biochemistry,” Dr. Hrabowski says. “And we believe that we, as professionals, as educators, should be as supportive of those students as possible.”

Click here to watch the video.