Thomas Schaller, Political Science, Op-Ed in The Baltimore Sun

Tom SchallerIn his latest column in The Baltimore Sun, Political Science Professor and Chair Thomas Schaller wrote about two major developments that have the potential to revolutionize collegiate athletics: an NCAA ruling that gave five major conferences greater autonomy and a federal judge ruling that stated the NCAA violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act by profiting from the images of student-athletes without compensating them.

When referring to the ruling in the federal case O’Bannon v. NCAA, Schaller wrote, “legal experts further believe that because the O’Bannon ruling vacates the NCAA’s long-cherished amateurism exception, a series of follow-up rulings may follow, including the resolution of a key case (Jenkins v. NCAA) that threatens to upend the NCAA’s current economic model.”

To read Schaller’s complete column published August 19 in The Baltimore Sun titled, “Getting their due,” click here.

Donald Norris, Public Policy, in The Baltimore Sun and on FOX 45

As the race for Maryland governor picks up in intensity in the coming weeks heading into the fall, Public Policy Professor and Chair Donald Norris was in the news this past week providing analysis on the state of the campaign.

Donald Norris UMBC“It’s clearly Anthony’s to lose,” said Norris in an August 14 article in The Baltimore Sun when referring to Democratic candidate Anthony Brown’s chances of winning the election. In a separate article, Norris commented on an event held at the Maryland Association of Counties (MACO) Convention in which Brown and Republican candidate Larry Hogan appeared separately to avoid face-to-face confrontation.

“There’s no reason for the front-runner to give the challenger any more opportunity to interact than necessary,” he said. “It’s not in the interest of the front-runner to do that.” Norris added history shows that the leader does not pay a political price for avoiding an opponent.

In an August 22 article, Norris commented on the messaging that Brown used with some of his policies to raise the minimum wage, to provide prekindergarten for children and to lower the cost of college in his first general election campaign television ad which aired recently in the Baltimore market: “I think this will be a campaign theme, and I expect we’ll see a lot more of it,” he said. “He’s going to be aiming that message at important subgroups within the Democratic Party in Maryland.”

In a story that aired on FOX 45 Baltimore, Norris was interviewed at the MACO Convention, where he was promoting UMBC’s Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research: “We do research for local government so we want to be here to show them what we do,” Norris said, noting that the conference is all about learning and networking. “It’s where local government officials and state government officials get together, share information, share knowledge, and discuss solutions to problems,” Norris added.

You can read the complete coverage by clicking below:

Brown to strike first on airwaves (Baltimore Sun)
Pundits have advice for Brown, Hogan in governor’s race (Baltimore Sun)
Brown, Hogan make pitches to county officials (Baltimore Sun)
MACO Conference taking place during peak season in Ocean City (FOX 45)

Amanda Knapp, Assistant Vice-Provost, in American Motorcyclist

UnlikelyRiders_DirtCover-page-001Amanda Knapp, assistant vice-provost of academic standards and policy administration, was profiled in American Motorcyclist in an article that featured motorcyclists from various backgrounds and professions who challenge common stereotypes.

Knapp discussed her passion for riding motorcycles, emphasizing its benefits in reducing stress, staying healthy and spending time with family. “When I am riding, it is the only time that I can block out the chaos around me and focus on myself,” she said. Knapp also talked about challenging stereotypes about women riders and called more women and girls to join the sport.

Click to read “Changing Perceptions.” Knapp’s profile can be found on pages 42-43.

Irene Chan, Visual Arts and Asian Studies, in Women’s Studio Workshop Spotlight

Irene Chan, Visual Arts and Asian Studies, is featured in an interview published by Women’s Studio Workshop (WSW), an arts center she first visited back in 1996 as a studio intern. She speaks about the development of her artwork, her use of materials, and her projects about racial and cultural identity. Read the interview here on WSW’s website.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in The New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, shares his take on the thousands of photographs flooding out of Ferguson, Missouri. “Historically, photography was integral to the fight against racism and segregation. Leaders from Sojourner Truth to Malcolm X embraced the photograph’s potential as evidence and its ability to combat stereotypes,” writes Berger. “But sometimes, as in Ferguson, the camera has served as a more spontaneous ‘weapon of choice,’ as the photographer Gordon Parks called it, wielded by the oppressed in moments of anger, fear or frustration.”

Read “In Ferguson, Photographs as Powerful Agents” and view the photographs at The New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column, which appears monthly on The New York Times website, is “a continuing exploration of the relationship of race to photographic portrayals of race.”

Robert Provine, Psychology, in BBC Future

As Psychology Professor Robert Provine puts it, “yawning may have the dubious distinction of being the least understood, common human behavior.” A recent in depth story published in BBC Future attempts to answer the baffling question of why we yawn, and Provine, one of the leading experts in the field and author of Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond, is quoted extensively in the story.

Robert Provine

In the article, Provine discusses how contagious yawning is: “Around 50% of people who observe a yawn will yawn in response,” Provine said. “It is so contagious that anything associated with it will trigger one…seeing or hearing another person, or even reading about yawning.” He also discussed how audiences frequently yawn as he is giving presentations: “It makes a very effective lecture,” he said. “You talk and then the audience starts yawning. And then you can ask people to experiment on their yawns – like closing the lips, or inhaling through clenched teeth, or trying to yawn with the nose pinched closed.”

To read the full article in BBC Future titled, “One of science’s most baffling questions? Why we yawn,” click here.

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, Guest Hosts The Marc Steiner Show

On Wednesday, August 13, Kimberly Moffit, associate professor of American studies, guest hosted The Marc Steiner Show on WEAA 88.9 FM. Filling in for Steiner, Moffitt led discussions on mental health in the African-American community and the Positive Social Change Theater Program, among other topics.

Moffitt interacted with guests such as Dr. Grady Daleclinical psychologist and co-founder of the American Institute for Urban Psychological Services, Mothyna James-Brightful, Visionary Director for Heal A Woman To Heal A Nation, and Koli Tengella, 2010 Open Society Institute Community Fellow and Executive Director of the Kulichagulia Project.

You can listen to the complete program that aired on Wednesday by clicking below:
Mental Health in the African-American Community (The Marc Steiner Show)
Positive Social Change Theater Program (The Marc Steiner Show)
This Week in City Paper (The Marc Steiner Show)