Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

On October 8,  WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show hosted a segment discussing the challenges, complexities and joys of raising and educating boys. Kimberly Moffitt, an associate professor of American studies, was a guest on the program and discussed her experience as a founding parent and trustee of Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys – a charter school opening in Baltimore City next year to serve boys in grades 4 through 12.

In a discussion about improving high school graduation rates among boys, Moffitt said: “This is a movement that is happening from the ground up.” Adding, “it’s about folks in the community who recognize something that’s happening with our children and want to do something about it instead of waiting for someone else within the federal government, or higher ups, or individuals who have their philanthropic ability to contribute. This is now very much about folks who are part of the community who see something real that needs to change because this is an epidemic for our boys and we want to see a shift in change.”

Moffitt appeared on the program with Jack Pannell, founder of Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys, and David Banks, President and CEO of the Eagle Academy Foundation and founding principal of the Eagle Academy for Young Men in the Bronx. To listen to the full segment, click here.

Moffitt also recently returned from Vienna, Austria where she gave two presentations based on her research. The University of Vienna and the American Embassy hosted “Transgressive Television: Politics, Crime, and Citizenship in 21st Century American TV Series,” where Moffitt gave a presentation on “Black Motherhood as Victimhood in The Wire.” Also, at the University of Graz (Austria), Department of American Studies “When I Talk about American Studies, I Talk about… Lecture,” Moffitt presented a talk entitled, “(In)visibility in Black and White: The Case of Disney’s The Princess and the Frog.”

Theo Gonzalves, American Studies, in Ian Ruskin Documentary on Barbara Dane

Actor, writer, and social activist Ian Ruskin has released a new two-hour documentary on the life of Barbara Dane. Titled, “A Wild Woman Sings the Blues: the Life and Music of Barbara Dane,” the documentary includes interviews with several musicians and others who know Dane well.

Theo Gonzalves, Associate Professor and Chair of American Studies, was interviewed for the project and appears in the documentary. Gonzalves is a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution, working with the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. His project, “Singing Truth to Power: The Story of Paredon Records,” traces the cultural history of a record label whose output of recorded music and speeches documented revolutionary movements throughout the globe. Dane founded Paredon Records in 1970 and produced 50 albums that Gonzalves is studying as part of his project.

Other interviews in the documentary include Pete Seeger, Arlo Guthrie, Irwin Silber, Holly Near, James Early, and many more. For more information on the documentary, click here. To read a UMBC Magazine story about Gonzalves’s project, click here.

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, joined The Marc Steiner Show on Monday, September 29 to discuss police brutality, societal perceptions of Black children and recent attacks on the Obamas. Other panelists in the roundtable included Marshall Bell, host of Midday Magazine with Marshall Bell and author of Baltimore Blues: Harm City, and Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

In the conversation about attacks on Michelle Obama, Moffitt related it to her research on body politics. “Oftentimes we look at the black body as being this space that occupies a position of being revered and reviled, all at the same time. And so, when you look at someone like Michelle Obama, she occupies that space constantly,” she said.

To hear the full segment on The Marc Steiner Show, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: The U.S. Constitution and the Battle Over Racial Equality Today (9/17)

Rogers SmithOn Wednesday, September 17 at 4:30 p.m. on the seventh floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library, Dr. Rogers Smith, H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, will present the Social Sciences Forum, “The U.S. Constitution and the Battle Over Racial Equality Today.”

The author of seven books on citizenship and equality in the United States, including one that was a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer Prize in History, Dr. Smith, H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, will address why America’s political leaders avoid discussing racial policies, even as many forms of racial inequality persist and deepen. Smith argues that the United States is profoundly divided between two rival conceptions of civic equality–but that common ground may be found in the bold views of the Constitution’s purposes advanced by Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

This is a Constitution and Citizenship Day Lecture, co-sponsored with the Departments of Political Science, Africana Studies, American Studies, Philosophy and Public Policy, and the Office of Student Life. For more information, click here.

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, Guest Hosts The Marc Steiner Show

On Wednesday, August 13, Kimberly Moffit, associate professor of American studies, guest hosted The Marc Steiner Show on WEAA 88.9 FM. Filling in for Steiner, Moffitt led discussions on mental health in the African-American community and the Positive Social Change Theater Program, among other topics.

Moffitt interacted with guests such as Dr. Grady Daleclinical psychologist and co-founder of the American Institute for Urban Psychological Services, Mothyna James-Brightful, Visionary Director for Heal A Woman To Heal A Nation, and Koli Tengella, 2010 Open Society Institute Community Fellow and Executive Director of the Kulichagulia Project.

You can listen to the complete program that aired on Wednesday by clicking below:
Mental Health in the African-American Community (The Marc Steiner Show)
Positive Social Change Theater Program (The Marc Steiner Show)
This Week in City Paper (The Marc Steiner Show)

Nicole King, American Studies, in City Paper

Nicole King, an associate professor of American studies, recently published an essay as part of an ongoing series in the “City Folk” section of City Paper profiling UMBC graduate student Chanan Delivuk. King met Delivuk through her work in the Filbert Street Community Garden in Curtis Bay earlier this year.

Delivuk is a community gardener and artist who uses new media to explore everyday stories in her art practice. The profile describes Delivuk growing up in the Curtis Bay neighborhood and how it provided a strong sense of place for her as she left town to go to college and eventually graduate school. King writes about Delivuk developing an interest in art while in college and her planned trip to Croatia this summer to further explore her Croatian heritage.

The compelling profile ends with a powerful quote from Delivuk as she is describing her home of Curtis Bay: “I will always live here because I love it so much,” she says. “I want to walk out on a busy street, with sirens going off, and people walking, and a lot going on. There’s something about this city that’s so unique.”

To read King’s full article in City Paper titled, “Conservation Artist: Chanan Delivuk has deep roots in Curtis Bay,” click here.

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

On Monday, May 19, WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show hosted a panel discussion remembering the life and legacy of Malcolm X. The day would have been his 89th birthday. American Studies Assistant Professor Kimberly Moffitt participated in the discussion and shared her thoughts on why Malcolm X might not play as significant a role with young learners as other activists during his time.

“A lot of that has to do with him not fitting the paradigm of what we consider to be acceptable activism,” Moffitt said. “At that point in time, even in the midst of a very radical period in our country’s history, he was seen as an extremist by many.”

Other panelists in the discussion included Karsonya Wise Whitehead, an assistant professor of communication and African and African American studies at Loyola University Maryland and Ray Winbush, Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University.

To listen to the full segment that aired on The Marc Steiner Show, click here. Moffitt is co-editor of Blackberries and Redbones: Critical Articulations of Black Hair/Body Politics in Africana Communities.