MFA Thesis Exhibition in City Paper

imageThe MFA Thesis Exhibition, now on display in the CADVC, was mentioned in an article by City Paper‘s Baynard Woods last week. The article highlighted UMBC’s well connected Visual Arts faculty, staff and MFA candidates in relation to the Baltimore arts community. Woods also mentions IMDA candidate Lexie Mountain’s performance piece exhibited at the opening, Fred Worden Cuts A Couch In Half With A Chainsaw.

Read “Art Seen” at City Paper‘s website.

Gravity Hill Newsreels: Occupy Wallstreet (4/14)

Jem-CohenThe Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents filmmaker Jem Cohen who will discuss 12 short observations about Occupy Wall Street (2011/2012), New York City. This presentation will take place Monday, April 14 at 7:00 p.m. in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.

“In regards to Occupy Wall Street, when friends asked me where the newsreels were, I decided to plunge in and make some myself. We knew there’d eventually be many documentaries made about the phenomenon and that there were already short advocacy pieces in support of the movement (as well as YouTube slams against it). My own interest lay elsewhere: in a kind of reporting based on direct observation that expresses solidarity without propaganda, while leaving room for experimentation and lyricism.” – Jem Cohen

Learn more about this event at our Arts and Culture Calendar.

MFA Thesis Exhibition (4/3-4/25)

mfa_card-1The CADVC is pleased to present the annual MFA Thesis exhibition, beginning this Thursday, April 3 and continuing through Friday, April 25.

This year’s Imaging and Digital Arts graduates displaying work in the exhibition include Michael Farley, Charlotte Keniston, Alexandra Macchi, Shana Palmer, Carrie Rennolds and Dominique Zeltzman. The work selected represents the culmination of each student’s unique experience in UMBC’s dynamic and demanding MFA program.

A free, opening reception at the CADVC will take place on Thursday April 3 from 5 pm until 7 pm.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest Race Story in New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column for the New York Times, Maurice Berger, CADVC, discusses “the power behind a remarkable interactive website called ‘Mirror of Race,’ which uses 19th century photographs depicting people of various races in situations that are often ambiguous in their content and intent.” Mirror of Race displays these photographs typical to the way in which they may be shown in a gallery setting, but in the absence of explanation and description.

Read “Holding a Mirror to Race” at the New York Times Lens Blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column has featured several essays centered upon race and photography including, Malcolm X as image maker, Ken Gonzales-Day, images of emancipation, the photographs of Deborah Will, the civil rights work of James Karales, and the woman in a civil rights photo, fifty seven years later.

New CADVC Outreach Project in the ‘Baltimore Guide’

An outreach project of the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, featuring “pop-up arts events” was discussed recently in the Baltimore Guide.

According to Sandra Abbott, CADVC Curator of Collections and Outreach, the “pop-ups” are so named because “they will suddenly appear in unoccupied spaces and then close down shortly thereafter.” The project, a result of a collaboration between the CADVC, the Southeast Community Development Corporation, the Highlandtown Arts District (ha!), and Glitter Thighs (a monthly queer dance party in Baltimore), will promote the potential of empty retail spaces on Eastern Ave.

Read the complete article, “Pop-ups promote the potential”.

“We’re All VideoFreex!,” presented by the CADVC (3/9)

freexThis Sunday, March 9 at 4:00 p.m., the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents “We’re All VideoFreex!,” a discussion with Skip Blumberg, Videofreex member and artist; Parry Teasdale, Videofreex co-founder and editor, and Tom Colley, collections manager, Video Data Bank. The presentation will take place in the East Building Auditorium, at the National Gallery of Art.

About the discussion:
“In the late 60s, the recording of image and sound with instantaneous playback signaled the dawn of a new media—video—that was more accessible and more discreet than film had ever been. With video cameras known as portapaks in hand, the co-founders of the Videofreex collective (1969-1978) were pioneers in the development of community television, founders of the country’s first pirate TV station, as well as mentors and instructors to countless individuals interested in making and sharing an open system of production. A selection of videos produced by the Freex and archived at Video Data Bank in Chicago features an interview with Fred Hampton of the Black Panthers, a discussion with organizer Abbey Hoffman, and excerpts from other early video recordings.”

This event is one of several talks, films and performances in the series organized by the CADVC, Jump Over Timecurated by Joanna Raczynska ’98, visual arts, of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Learn more at our Arts and Culture Calendar.

‘Visibility Machines’ at CADVC in City Paper

VM_cadvc_img“Are we creating a world where atrocities can be committed at the push of a button, and then immediately forgotten?,” asks City Paper’s H. Dean Freeman in response to the exhibition currently on display in the CADVC, Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen. Using the exhibition as a vehicle with which to discuss “what happens when technology sets its sights on mimicking human perception,” Freeman describes works in the exhibition, as “arresting” and “invigorating.”

Read the article, “Droning On: UMBC show takes on technology, capitalism, and warfare”

Visibility Machines, organized by visiting curator Niels Van Tomme, is on display through Feburary 22. The CADVC is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest Essay in New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column for the New York Times, Maurice Berger, CADVC, discusses Civil Rights Photographer Jon Lewis’ pictures of farm workers outside of the Jim Crow South. Berger writes about Lewis’ “precise and moving” documentation of the Delano Grape Strike that, “offers great insights about the strike and the canny understanding of photography of its leader, Cesar Chavez.”

Read “A Civil Rights Photographer, and a Struggle, Are Remembered” at the New York Times Lens Blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column has featured several essays centered upon race and photography including, Malcolm X as image maker, Ken Gonzales-Day, images of emancipation, the photographs of Deborah Will, the civil rights work of James Karales, and the woman in a civil rights photo, fifty seven years later.

Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen (10/24)

war-at-a-distance

Thursday, October 24 the exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen opens in the CADVC. Join us for the opening reception, Thursday October 24 from 5 to 7 p.m..

Visibility Machines explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed—and politicized—our relationship to images and the realities they appear to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film and new media.

Visibility Machines continues through February 22. The CADVC is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Learn more about the artists and this exhibition at our Arts and Culture Calendar.

Artist Conversation: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen (10/21)

war-at-a-distanceMultimedia artists and educators, Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen of the CADVC exhibition Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki & Trevor Paglen, speak about their work focused in the investigation of military surveillance, espionage, war-making and weaponry, and its relevance in today’s geopolitical climate. Join the conversation, Monday, October 21, 3:30 p.m. at the National Gallery of Art.

Visibility Machines explores the unique roles Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen play as meticulous observers of the global military industrial complex. Farocki and Paglen each examine the deceptive and clandestine ways in which military projects have deeply transformed—and politicized—our relationship to images and the realities they appear to represent. The exhibition initiates critical questions about the crucial part images play in revealing essential but largely concealed information, and places the oeuvres of Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen within the broader cultural and historical developments of the media they are creatively working with, namely photography, film and new media.

Learn more about the artists and the upcoming CADVC exhibition, Visibility Machines, at our Arts & Culture Calendar.

National Gallery of Art, East Building Auditorium
6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC

Admission to this event, and to the National Gallery is free.