Niels Van Tomme, CADVC, Named Curator of the 7th Bucharest Biennale

nielsvt_web1Niels Van Tomme, Visiting Curator of the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, has been named Curator of the 7th Bucharest Biennale (Bucharest International Biennial for Contemporary Art), to take place May 26 to July 17, 2016.

The Bucharest Biennale is interested in exploring links between creative practice and social progress, as well as correspondences between local and global contexts. Now in its tenth year, the Biennale continues to build a strong partnership between Bucharest—a geocultural space where the political is reflected in all aspects of life—and the rest of the world. In transcending specific geographical, historical, or political frameworks, it connects to a broader complexity, namely the one of “resistance” within the quotidian realm.

More information about the Biennale is available on its website.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in the New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, examines Dawoud Bey’s intimate and powerful 2007 portrait of Barack Obama prior to becoming president. The essay is being co-published by the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art. “The photograph depicts its famously private and introspective subject only months before he was to step into the abyss of presidential politics. And it defines him free of the stereotypes and myths that have come to characterize his presidency,” observers Berger.

Read “Meditation on President Obama’s Portrait” and view the photograph at the New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column has featured several essays centered upon race and photography, including Malcolm X as image maker, Ken Gonzales-Day, images of emancipation, the photographs of Deborah Will, and the civil rights work of James Karales.

Roy Meyers, Political Science, on MarylandReporter.com

In an op-ed published July 24 on MarylandReporter.com, Political Science Professor Roy Meyers writes about a proposed bill that would allow U.S. corporations to avoid taxes when they repatriate profits that are now booked overseas, if they purchase bonds that would be used to build infrastructure.

Roy Meyers (UMBC)

In his column, Meyers writes that the bill deserves scrutiny, noting: “[the bill] would create the American Infrastructure Fund (AIF) and capitalize it with up to $50 billion. That money would be used to finance infrastructure projects that pass benefit-cost tests.”

He adds, “the projects would be expected to pay the AIF back, meaning that the infrastructure projects most likely to be financed through the AIF would be those where it would easy to charge tolls. The AIF is thus somewhat duplicative of the existing Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program, and like various proposals to create an ‘infrastructure bank.’ Assuming that the bank would spend $10 billion a year for five years, it would add a small amount of funding for federal investment.”

To read Meyer’s full column on MarylandReporter.com, click here.

Leslie Morgan, Sociology and Anthropology, in The Baltimore Beacon

An article published in the August 2014 edition of The Baltimore Beacon newspaper examines the struggles and challenges caregivers can face while caring for elderly family members. The article covers topics ranging from finding support and treatment for caregivers’ own health to caregiver stress and benefits.

Leslie Morgan

Leslie Morgan, professor of sociology and co-director of the UMBC/UMB Ph.D. program in gerontology, was interviewed for the article and said the subject of caregiver stress has been a focus of research for almost three decades.

“This is a time when you and your loved can be together and get closer,” Morgan said, “when hopefully, you’ll have the time to say things you might not otherwise have said, and to show your affection for each other.”

You can read the complete article titled, “Ups and downs of caregiving,” by clicking here.

Nicole King, American Studies, in City Paper

Nicole King, an associate professor of American studies, recently published an essay as part of an ongoing series in the “City Folk” section of City Paper profiling UMBC graduate student Chanan Delivuk. King met Delivuk through her work in the Filbert Street Community Garden in Curtis Bay earlier this year.

Delivuk is a community gardener and artist who uses new media to explore everyday stories in her art practice. The profile describes Delivuk growing up in the Curtis Bay neighborhood and how it provided a strong sense of place for her as she left town to go to college and eventually graduate school. King writes about Delivuk developing an interest in art while in college and her planned trip to Croatia this summer to further explore her Croatian heritage.

The compelling profile ends with a powerful quote from Delivuk as she is describing her home of Curtis Bay: “I will always live here because I love it so much,” she says. “I want to walk out on a busy street, with sirens going off, and people walking, and a lot going on. There’s something about this city that’s so unique.”

To read King’s full article in City Paper titled, “Conservation Artist: Chanan Delivuk has deep roots in Curtis Bay,” click here.

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, Op-Ed in The Baltimore Sun

Tom SchallerIn his latest column in The Baltimore Sun, Political Science Professor Thomas Schaller writes about American small businesses competing against multinational corporations. In his column titled, “A fairer (small) business environment,” Schaller argues that small businesses face a competitive disadvantage because they are “politically overmatched against multinational corporate giants.”

He adds, “the Democrats’ strong union ties tend to complicate their relationship with business generally, even if the party is increasingly dependent upon corporate campaign donations. And if the Democrats might be described as a partially-owned subsidiary of corporate America, consider the Republicans a wholly-owned franchise.”

To read the full article published July 22 in The Baltimore Sun, click here.

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Welcomes New Faculty

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences has announced its new faculty members who are starting at UMBC this fall. Below is the complete list of new professors listed by discipline:

Visual Arts: Assistant Professor Corrie Parks (animation and interactive media)
Africana Studies: Assistant Professor Maleda Belilgne (Black comparative literature)
Ancient Studies: Assistant Professor Michael Lane (Greek archaeology)
Public Policy: Assistant Professor Lauren Edwards (public administration)
Sociology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor Dena Smith (medical/health sociology)
Sociology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor Loren Henderson (medical/health sociology)
Language, Literacy, and Culture: Professor Cedric Herring (sociologist of race and education, policy, and other areas)
Global Studies and Political Science: Assistant Professor Felipe Filomeno (Latin America/globalization)
Psychology: Assistant Professor Jolene Sy (applied behavioral analysis)
English: Assistant Professor Steph Ceraso (digital humanities/composition)

Donald Norris, Public Policy, in The Washington Post and The Baltimore Sun

Larry Hogan, the Republican nominee for Maryland governor, decided last week to participate in the state’s public financing system in the fall election. Hogan is the first candidate in 20 years to do so for a statewide general election. Hogan will receive a grant of about $2.6 million from the state, and his campaign will not be allowed to spend more than that on the race.

Donald Norris UMBC

Donald Norris, professor and chair of the public policy department, was interviewed about Hogan’s decision by The Washington Post and The Baltimore Sun“It surprises me a great deal that Hogan is going this way,” Norris told the Washington Post. “It tells me that the smart money is going elsewhere or people with money don’t think Hogan is going to win.”

In The Baltimore Sun, Norris said: “Nobody does this because they want to. They do this because they have to — and they have to because they can’t raise substantial amounts of money in any other way.” To read the full articles about Hogan’s decision, click below:

Republican Larry Hogan to use public funds in campaign for governor of Maryland (Washington Post)
Hogan opts for public financing in governor’s race (Baltimore Sun)

Bambi Chapin, Sociology and Anthropology, on WYPR’s Maryland Morning

Bambi Chapin, an associate professor of sociology and anthropology, is the author of a compelling new book which offers a global perspective on the transmission of culture and childhood development. The book, Childhood in a Sri Lankan Village: Shaping Hierarchy and Desire, describes the results of Chapin’s anthropological research done while living for nearly two years in a central Sri Lankan village observing and studying how mothers were raising their children.

Bambi Chapin book

Chapin was interviewed on WYPR’s Maryland Morning about her new book and what she set out to discover: “How is it that people become the culturally shaped people we become? What happens in how we’re raised, in the experiences that we have that make us want to be in the relationships that we want to be in?” Chapin said. “How does culture get transmitted?”

Discussing her research further, Chapin said, “I really became interested in the subtle, every day kinds of interactions that produce such surprising results. I then tried to unpack that and use it as an example to call into question some of our assumptions of how children are and how they learn.”

“The people I knew in Sri Lanka thought that maturity was demonstrated by knowing when to hold your tongue, knowing who was wiser than you, who would make a better decision, and by choosing to go along with that,” she added.

To listen to interview in its entirety that aired July 9, click here.

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Politico Magazine and The Baltimore Sun

An article published July 8 in Politico Magazine discusses recent election strategies used by Democrats in Southern states. Thomas Schaller, a political science professor and author of Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South, was interviewed for the article and offered analysis on how Democratic candidates in recent presidential elections have built coalitions of support in the South.

Tom Schaller

“When you look at the last two Democratic presidents, both of them won non-Southern Electoral College majorities,” Schaller said. “They both had 270 votes outside the South. Their coalitions were a little different in terms of Southern support. Clinton got more ‘bubba’ support in Arkansas, Tennessee, Florida and Georgia. Obama didn’t win any of those states except for Florida but he won Virginia twice and North Carolina once.”

Schaller added that even with President Obama’s wins in the South, “those states have very high, among the three or four highest, populations of non-Southern people … Democrats are winning in the South but not with native Southerners.”

Schaller also published an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun on July 8 about the dramatic shift in corporate taxation in recent decades. You can read both articles by clicking on the links below.

Do Democrats Need a Bubba Strategy? (Politico Magazine)
Not Taxing U.S. Corporations Gives a Pass to Foreigners (Baltimore Sun)