UMBC Symphony with the Trio des Alpes (11/23)

5686666591_32fa989994_oOn Sunday, November 23, the UMBC Symphony Orchestra will perform under the direction of E. Michael Richards, joined by the Trio des Alpes (Mirjam Tschopp, violin and viola; Claude Hauri, cello; and Corrado Greco, piano).

The program will feature:
· Daniel Schnyder: Triple Concerto (featuring the Trio des Alpes)
· Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47
· Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov: Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34

This event is supported in part by Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council and the FONDATION SUISA.

The concert will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Concert Hall, located in the Performing Arts and Humanities Building. Admission is free.

Trio des Alpes Masterclass (11/22)

Trio des AlpesAs part of a two-week residency, the critically renowned Trio des Alpes will present a public masterclass with students from UMBC, Peabody Conservatory, and the University of Maryland, College Park. Open free of admission to the public, the masterclass will be held on Saturday, November 22, from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. in the Concert Hall, located in the Performing Arts and Humanities Building.

This event is supported in part by Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council and the FONDATION SUISA.

Click here for complete information.

Trio des Alpes — “Rush Hour” Concert with UMBC Faculty (11/21)

9The UMBC Department of Music wishes to thank UMBC faculty and staff for their extraordinary commitment to the campus to begin the Thanksgiving holiday season at this free concert in the beautiful new concert hall!

“Individually excellent, they are even more impressive together,” wrote the Gazzetta di Mantova after a concert by the Italian-Swiss Trio des Alpes, thereby describing one of this Trio’s essential qualities: three independent, all-round successful personalities meeting as a trio. What attracts them is the quintessence of chamber music: dialogue, a shared sound and the blending of three instruments into a single whole.

In this special “Rush Hour” concert, entitled Giving Thanks, the Trio will be joined by UMBC faculty Janice Jackson (voice), E. Michael Richards (clarinet), Airi Yoshioka (violin), and Christian Tremblay (violin) in performances of the Clarinet Trio, Op. 114 by Johannes Brahms; the Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81, by Antonín Dvořák; and the Chanson d’amour by Amy Beach.

Mirjam Tschopp, who gave her debut as a soloist aged 13, is equally successful on the violin and the viola, appearing as a soloist with renowned orchestras such as the WDR Symphonieorchester Köln under Semyon Bychkov and in chamber music with Anne-Sophie Mutter and the Mandelring Quartet, among others. Claude Hauri has made his name as solo cellist of several excellent groups such as the Ensemble Nuovo Contrappunto in Florence and the Ensemble Algoritmo in Rome, and as a performer of new music. He has premiered a multitude of works, several dedicated to him, by important composers. Corrado Greco’s versatility adds further impetus to the Trio des Alpes. Besides performing with such personalities as Bruno Canino ormembers of the Berliner Philharmoniker, he is professor of musical communication and multimedia in Varese, where he also directs the Università dell’Insubria concert series.

This event is supported in part by Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council and the FONDATION SUISA.

This free performance will be held on Friday, November 21, at 4:30 p.m. in the Concert Hall, located in the Performing Arts and Humanities Building.

Click here for complete information.

The Game of Love and Chance by Pierre de Marivaux, directed by Stephen Nunns (11/20 – 11/23)

game-of-love-and-chanceThe Game of Love and Chance by Pierre de Marivaux, translated & adapted by Stephen Wadsworth, guest directed by Stephen Nunns

The Game of Love and Chance is a wild and wooly girl-meets-boy farce about mistaken identity, true love, class disparities and the thorny business of marriage by French dramatist Pierre de Marivaux. When two aristocratic kids decide to undermine their parents’ plan for an arranged marriage by switching identities with their servants, confusion and madness reigns. By resetting the action as a 1930s screwball comedy, this version of The Game of Love and Chance is as lively and timely as when it was originally staged 300 years ago.

The Game of Love and Chance is directed by Stephen Nunns, an associate professor at Towson University. He was a co founder of the Baltimore-based theatre collective The Acme Corporation and co-directed the company’s 24-hour production of Samuel Beckett’s Play, which won Best Production in the City Paper’s Best of Baltimore for 2013. Before coming to Baltimore, Stephen lived in New York City for fifteen years, directing, writing, and composing music for theatre pieces at a variety of off-off Broadway venues, including HERE, The Ontological-Hysteric Theater, Dance Theater Workshop and the 78th Street Theatre Lab. He was an associate artist at the seminal avant-garde theatre company Mabou Mines, where he created three theatre pieces, including the Obie Award-winning The Boys in the Basement. His book, Acting Up: Free speech, pragmatism, and American performance in the 20th century, was recently published by LFB Scholarly Publishing.

All performances will be held in the Proscenium Theatre, Performing Arts and Humanities Building:
Thursday, November 20, 8:00 p.m.
Friday, November 21, 8:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 22, 8:00 p.m.
*Sunday, November 23, 2:00 p.m.

$15 general admission, $10 students and seniors. Purchase no-fee tickets at Missiontix.com.

*Matinee performances are free for UMBC students with a UMBC ID. Students may pick up their tickets from the Theatre Department Office Monday – Thursday, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m, or at the box office beginning at 1 p.m. on the day of the matinee. Limit one ticket per student.

Presented by the Department of Theatre. Click here to view complete information.

Political Science and Public Policy Faculty Provide Additional Election Analysis

Following last week’s election, UMBC political science and public policy faculty continued to provide analysis as the final vote totals were tallied and future policy issues were discussed.

Tom SchallerPolitical Science Professor and Chair Thomas Schaller wrote a column in the Baltimore Sun in which he analyzed the results in Maryland’s gubernatorial election. He noted that Governor-Elect Larry Hogans’s victory was, “less about turnout than a conversion of the Maryland electorate.” Schaller discussed his column on WYPR’s “Midday with Dan Rodricks” (begins at 23:40) and WBAL’s “The C4 Show.”

Donald Norris UMBCPublic Policy Professor and Chair Donald Norris was interviewed for a Washington Post article in which he commented on how the Congressional elections will affect Maryland: “’It’s going to be a really ugly two years’ for Maryland, said Norris. In particular, he said, federal funding for the Chesapeake Bay cleanup will likely be at risk. Republicans may also do their best to blunt federal regulations governing the bay environment.”

Roy Meyers (UMBC)Political Science Professor Roy Meyers was quoted in Grist and discussed Maryland’s stormwater management fee. He stated, “there’s no way to reduce your tax burden if you come up with ways of mitigating stormwater runoff at your home.” Meaning, for example, if you install equipment in your roof that captures the rain, preventing runoff, you still have to pay the stormwater fee.

Tyson King-MeadowsTyson King-Meadows, Chair of the Africana Studies Department and Associate Professor of Political Science, was quoted in a Salt Lake Tribune article and discussed a political study in Utah that he conducted with colleagues at Brigham Young University on racial attitudes and campaign messaging.

To read and listen to complete election coverage by UMBC faculty during the week of November 10, click below.

Thomas Schaller:
Race had a role in Hogan’s win (Baltimore Sun op-ed) 
Midday with Dan Rodricks (WYPR)
The C4 Show (WBAL- audio not posted)

Donald Norris:
With new Congress, D.C. Region is Losing Clout (Washington Post)

Roy Meyers:
Was the shocking outcome of Maryland’s gubernatorial race about rain, or something else? (Grist)

Tyson King-Meadows:
Mia Love: Utahns care little about race (Salt Lake Tribune)