Humanities Forum: Translating the Indian Past: The Poets’ Experience (10/13)

On Monday, October 13 at 4 p.m., Arvind Krishna Mehrotra will present the Humanities Forum, “Translating the Indian Past: The Poets’ Experience.” The event will take place in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.

Arvind Krishna Mehrotra

Mehrotra, one of India’s most celebrated contemporary poets and an acclaimed translator of Indian literature, will talk about how three important Indian poets (Toru Dutt, AK Ramanujan, and Arun Kolatkar) translated the Indian classics. Translation is never simple, but these Indian translators added to their translations many strands, giving their work the feel of a multicolored rope. Toru’s translation of a Purana story would be unthinkable without her Christianity; Ramanujan’s translations of Sangam poetry, Nammanlvar, and the Virasaiva poets without Modernism; and Kolatkar’s of the Marathi bhakti poets without the American idiom, which he sometimes employed in his own poems as well. While these translations bring past and present together in the ongoing construction of India’s literary heritage, they also lead us to ask broader questions: Are the Indian poet-translators exemplars of ‘world lit.’ or do they bring a particularly ‘Indian’ perspective to translation; or is it both?

The event is sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities and by the Asian Studies Program; the English Department; the Global Studies Program; and the Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication Department. For more information, click here.

Revolution of the Eye in Broadway World

Revolution of the Eye MicrositeRevolution of Eye, an exhibition organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture and the Jewish Museum in New York, and curated by Maurice Berger, research professor and chief curator at the CADVC, received coverage in Broadway World on October 1. (Click here to read the article). The exhibition will open in May 2015 and will be the first to explore how avant-garde art influenced and shaped the look and content of network television in its formative years, from the late 1940s to the mid-1970s. A microsite that provides a preview to the exhibition is now available here.

Livewire Festival: Ensemble Laboratorium (10/18)

Ensemble LaboratoriumThe Department of Music’s Livewire festival presents the Ensemble Laboratorium, which will perform a collection of movements from single work, also entitled Laboratorium, by renowned composer Vinko Globokar.

Inspired by their time spent working together under the direction of Pierre Boulez at the 2004 Lucerne Festival Academy, a group of young musicians formed Laboratorium. Hailing from 15 countries on 5 continents, its members are especially interested in the study and interpretation of both the established and the obscure repertoire of the 20th & 21st centuries. Likewise they are actively commissioning new works as well as engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations with artists from other fields.

Saturday, October 18, 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall, Performing Arts and Humanities Building.
$15 general admission, $10 seniors and $5 students. Tickets are available online at MissionTix.
Admission is free with a UMBC ID (tickets available at the door).

Click here for additional information.

Livewire Festival: Patrick Crossland, Trombone (10/17)

Patrick CrosslandThe Department of Music’s annual Livewire festival of new music presents trombonist Patrick Crossland, who will perform major works from the contemporary music repertoire, including:

• Rene Leibowitz: Quatre Bagatelles pour trombone et piano (1963)
• Luciano Berio: Sequenza V (1966)
• Carlos Alsina: Consecuenza (1966)
• Mauricio Kagel: atem für einen Bläser (1970)
• Jürg Wyttenbach: D’(H)ommage oder “Freu(n)de, nicht…” (1985)
• Jean-Pierre Drouet: Essais de Trombone (1998)
• John Palmer: transfiguration (2006)

Patrick Crossland was born in Jackson, Mississippi. Growing up in southern Louisiana, he began playing trombone at age 10. He has worked closely with several prominent composers. Solo performances include the Walker Art Center’s “Festival Dancing In Your Head” (2001, 2002, 2005), the Darmstadt Course for New Music (2004, 2006, 2008), where he was awarded a Solo Performance Prize, and the “Utopia Jetzt!” Festival (Germany) where he performed his acclaimed “V for Grock” multimedia recital. In 2009 he premiered his “Krieg dem Krieg” project featuring thematic works for trombone and electronics. In addition to his activities as a soloist and chamber musician, he is an avid improviser, working with a wide range of musicians, dancers, and actors. He is a member of the Composers Slide Quartet, Ensemble Laboratorium, and Zinc & Copper Works. Recently relocated to the Baltimore area, he teaches trombone and other music courses at UMBC.

Friday, October 17, 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall, Performing Arts and Humanities Building.
$15 general admission, $10 seniors, $5 students. Tickets are available online at MissionTix.
Admission is free with a UMBC ID (tickets available at the door).

Click here for additional information.

Livewire Festival: Ruckus (10/16)

think_create_engage_red.jpgThe Department of Music’s annual Livewire festival of new music presents Ruckus, the contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, featuring clarinetist E. Michael Richards, flutist Lisa Cella, percussionist Tom Goldstein, trombonist Patrick Crossland, and other colleagues. The ensemble will present a concert featuring masterpieces from the new music repertoire, including:

• Vinko Globokar: Correspondences
• Karlheinz Stockhausen: Dr K–Sextett
• René Leibowitz: Variations non sérieuses, for violine, posaune, vibraphone, and piano, “Marijuana,” Op.54
• Helmut Lachenmann: Dal Niente (Intérieur III)

Thursday, October 16, 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall, Performing Arts and Humanities Building.
$15 general admission, $10 seniors and $5 students. Tickets are available online at MissionTix.
Admission is free with a UMBC ID (tickets available at the door).

Click here for additional information.

Neja Tomšič, Visiting Artist Lecture (10/15)

tumblr_mklmvb2Tzj1s803lqo1_1280The Department of Visual Arts presents a lecture by artist-in-residence Neja Tomšič on Wednesday, October 15 at 12:00 p.m. in Room 132, Performing Arts and Humanities Building.

Tomšič is a visual artist and writer from Ljubljana, Slovenia. Since graduating from the painting department at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana, she has been part of individual and group exhibitions for drawing and media, performing and publishing poetry and prose, among others. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Philosophy and Theory of Visual Culture at the University of Primorska, researching documentary cinema and related practices in the contemporary art context. She is the manager and editor of the ArtistTalk project.

Tomšič will be in residence in UMBC’s Department of Visual Arts for five weeks this fall, from October 9 until November 12. The residency was made possible by CEC ArtsLink. ArtsLink Residencies offer artists and arts managers from 37 overseas countries five-week residencies at non-profit arts organizations throughout the United States. The program enables artists and communities across the U.S. to share artistic practices with artists and arts managers from abroad and engage in dialogue that advances understanding across cultures.

Click here for additional information.

UMBC Jazz Ensemble (10/12)

jazzensemble02-sThe Department of Music presents the UMBC Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Matthew Belzer in concert on Sunday, October 12 at 3:00 p.m. in the new Concert Hall, located in the Performing Arts and Humanities Building.

Admission to the concert is free; contributions will be accepted.