17th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences (Abstract Due 9/25)

This Symposium seeks to display the diverse array of student-committed endeavors and foster the communication of their relevant novel results and concepts. The event exclusively features undergraduate research in all areas of chemistry, biology and biochemistry with the understanding that progress at the chemical and biological interface requires cross-fertilization from the broadest possible spectrum of these disciplines.

The Symposium invites mentor-approved contributions from undergraduates investigating any aspect of chemistry, biology, and biochemistry. These advances will be disseminated in a daylong event that typically offers nearly 200 student contributions and gathers more than 400 beginning scientists, mentors, and other guests. The event will feature two poster sessions with posters judged by panels of participating mentors and other qualified attendees. Judges will rank first and second place posters in each category with non-financial awards presented at the event’s end.

The event is free, but registration is required. Light-fare refreshments and lunch will be provided. Faculty mentors and qualified attendees are encouraged to support this exceptional undergraduate experience by volunteering to serve as poster session judges.

Abstract Submission Deadline: Midnight EST, Thursday, September 25, 2014

Advanced Registration Deadline: Midnight EST, Wednesday, October 22, 2014

CNMS Hosts 17th Annual SURF

SURF2014-9148The College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences hosted the 17th annual Summer Undergraduate Research Fest (SURF) on Wednesday, August 6.

Over 200 students gave oral and poster presentations, explaining the results of their summer research projects. Many of the students participated in specialized programs to complete their research, including with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), High Performance Computing (HPC) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site at UMBC, Summer Biomedical Training Program, and MARC U*STAR program. SURF also featured a workshop to help more undergraduates gain interest in pursuing research opportunities.

SURF concluded by recognizing the commitment of the faculty, staff and graduate student mentors who supported the undergraduate research projects.

Research Compliance Education Sessions

Want to learn more about UMBC’s research compliance program? Have a burning question about regulations? Need an “experienced” eye to review an application before submitted, for example, to the IRB? Unsure if your investigation requires review for conflicts of interest or use of controlled materials or data?

Come join your Office of Research Protections and Compliance (ORPC) colleagues on Wednesdays during this semester over in bwTech North (the Research Park) to discuss and answer your questions. A complete schedule of topic, days and times, registration and directions can be found here.

Questions? Please contact the ORPC at 5-2737 or compliance@umbc.edu.

Safety Workshop for Researchers Traveling Abroad (8/26)

Do you take your personal or UMBC issued electronics (laptops, telephones, tablets) when traveling? Have you been invited to lecture or collaborate with a university outside the US? What protections should you follow?

Come meet and listen to an expert from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to discuss general awareness and travel precautions to take when traveling abroad to protect you and your research. The workshop will be held on August 26, 2014 from 11 A.M.- 12.30 P.M. in bwtech@UMBC North, Suite 310. Registration ends August 20, 2014.

Click here to register and learn more.

UMBC Technology Catalyst Fund Request For Proposals

Need support to advance an idea?

The UMBC Office of Technology Development (OTD), under the Office of the Vice President for Research, is happy to announce a new initiative, the UMBC Technology Catalyst Fund, which is designed to advance innovations originating from UMBC research to more commercially viable technologies.

UMBC plans to make several awards up to $25,000. Awards will be for a six- to twelve- month period. No overhead will apply.

All UMBC members with Principal Investigator status are eligible to apply as long as the technology to be developed has been previously disclosed to OTD.

The final deadline for proposal submissions is Tuesday, September 30, 2014. Please be advised that several preliminary steps must be completed prior to final submission and applicants are advised to contact OTD at least 3 weeks in advance of the deadline.

Interested applicants should contact Wendy Martin, Director, OTD at wmartin@umbc.edu.

UMBC Co-Hosts NIH Regional Seminar

UMBC Research Poster at NIH June 2014 - 2

Tina Stanger, Deborah Waters, Dean Drake, and Tim Sparklin

UMBC joined the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Towson University in co-hosting the 2014 Regional Seminar on Program Funding and Grants Administration on June 25-27, 2014.

The seminar is intended to demystify the NIH application and review process, clarify federal regulations and policies, and highlight current areas of special interest for research administrators, graduate students and new investigators. Over 800 participants from across the nation and from a variety of research institutes attended the seminar.

“We are delighted that UMBC was invited to co-host this Regional NIH Seminar,” says Karl Steiner, Vice President for Research at UMBC. “The exposure of our colleagues to the latest information directly from NIH is invaluable, and it gave our campus a chance to share with other participants the exciting research activities underway at UMBC.”

Tom Cronin, Biology, in WIRED

What’s the Absurd Creature of the Week in WIRED science? Why it’s none other than one of biologist Tom Cronin’s favorite sea critters, the mantis shrimp. And the eyes of these creatures are Cronin’s specialty and that’s where he comes into the article.

“As with bees or flies or crabs, they are compound eyes, but unlike those creatures, mantis shrimp “have a very unusual adaptation in that multiple parts of the same eye view the same point in space,” said biologist Tom Cronin of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, “which is sort of like having multiple eyes in one, in a way.” Whereas we use two eyes to judge distance, mantis shrimp can do that with a single eye.”

“On top of that, some mantis shrimp can see a variety of colors in ultraviolet, so “they’re seeing colors that no other animal can see, in a sense,” said Cronin. “Basically color is a property of the nervous system so it’s not really present in the real world, but they can see aspects of the ultraviolet that nothing else can see.”

There are some neat photos with the article and some videos. Well worth a read.