Social Sciences Forum: Economic Freedom and the Wealth and Health of Nations (10/13)

Robert LawsonOn Monday, October 13 at 4 p.m., Robert A. Lawson will present the Social Sciences Forum, “Economic Freedom and the Wealth and Health of Nations.” The event will take place on the seventh floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

Dr. Lawson and his colleagues produce the annual Economic Freedom of the World Index. Dr. Lawson will discuss the Index and how economic freedom impacts the wealth and health of countries worldwide.

Lawson is the Jerome M. Fullinwider Endowed Centennial Chair in Economic Freedom, The O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom at Southern Methodist University. The event is sponsored by the Department of Economics. For more information, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: The Unforseen Anticompetitive and Racially Discriminatory Effects of Baseball’s North American Draft (9/18)

Stephen RossOn Thursday, September 18 at 4:00 p.m. in the University Center Room 312, Stephen F. Ross, Director, Penn State Institute for Sports Law, Policy, and Research, Penn State University Dickinson School of Law, will present the Social Sciences Forum, “The Unforseen Anticompetitive and Racially Discriminatory Effects of Baseball’s North American Draft.”

When Major League Baseball instituted its amateur draft in 1966, elite players honed their sills in widely available competitions organized by high schools and the American Legion.  Today, virtually all North American youth selected in the draft or offered major college scholarships must join private, elite, and expensive traveling teams to display their talent.  In contrast, MLB teams spend millions to train poor Latin American kids in academies, because these young men are not subject to the draft. Ross, Lewis H. Vovakis Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Law, will propose modifications to create economic incentives for MLB teams to invest in domestic academies for youth unable to afford private teams.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Economics. For more information, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: The U.S. Constitution and the Battle Over Racial Equality Today (9/17)

Rogers SmithOn Wednesday, September 17 at 4:30 p.m. on the seventh floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library, Dr. Rogers Smith, H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, will present the Social Sciences Forum, “The U.S. Constitution and the Battle Over Racial Equality Today.”

The author of seven books on citizenship and equality in the United States, including one that was a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer Prize in History, Dr. Smith, H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, will address why America’s political leaders avoid discussing racial policies, even as many forms of racial inequality persist and deepen. Smith argues that the United States is profoundly divided between two rival conceptions of civic equality–but that common ground may be found in the bold views of the Constitution’s purposes advanced by Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

This is a Constitution and Citizenship Day Lecture, co-sponsored with the Departments of Political Science, Africana Studies, American Studies, Philosophy and Public Policy, and the Office of Student Life. For more information, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: John L. Jackson, Jr.: Black Gods and Red Devils: Race, Religion and the Re-Imagining of Africana Subjectivity (4/7)

jjacksonOn Monday, April 7 at 4:00 p.m. in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, John L. Jackson presents, “Black Gods and Red Devils: Race, Religion and the Re-Imagining of Africana Subjectivity.”

Professor Jackson will discuss the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem, a group of African Americans that emigrated from the United States to Israel in the 1960s. His talk will explain how this group understands their links to the ancient Hebrews and how they have spent the last 45 years in Israel creating a transnational spiritual community with members in Africa, Europe and the Americas that attempts to radically re-imagine what “race” and “religion” mean in the 21st century.

John L. Jackson, Jr. is the Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies and Anthropology in the Standing Faculty of the Annenberg School for Communication and the Standing Faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.

Admission to this event is free. It’s co-sponsored with the Africana Studies Research Colloquium and the Department of Africana Studies. For more information, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: Karen L. Cox: Dreaming of Dixie: How the South was Created in American Popular Culture (4/2)

On Wednesday, April 2, Karen L. Cox presents “Dreaming of Dixie: How the South was Created in American Popular Culture,” at 4 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery.

Low Lecture

From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture represented the American South by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, and white-columned mansions. In Dreaming of Dixie (2011), Professor Cox shows that the chief purveyors of nostalgia for the Old South played to consumers’ anxiety about modernity by marketing the South as a region still dedicated to America’s pastoral traditions. Professor Cox will also examine more recent representations of the South on television from The Andy Griffith Show to reality TV.

Karen L. Cox is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the founding director of the graduate public history program.

Admission to the event is free. The annual Low Lecture is co-sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities and the Department of History. For more information, click here.

Social Sciences Forum: “Changing Demography, Eroding Democracy: Challenges to Latinos in the 21st Century” (3/27)

SaenzProfessor Rogelio Sáenz, Dean of the College of Public Policy and Peter Flawn Professor of Demography at the University of Texas at San Antonio, will present, “Changing Demography, Eroding Democracy: Challenges to Latinos in the 21st Century,” on Thursday, March 27 at 4.30 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

Sáenz will provide an overview of the growth of the Latino population in the 21st century and the backlash that has occurred in efforts to minimize the political representation of Latinos. He will also discuss the opportunities and challenges that are ahead for Latinos.

The event is co-sponsored by the Social Sciences Forum, the Latino/Hispanic
Faculty Association, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and the
Language, Literacy & Culture Doctoral Program.

Looking Forward from the 45th Anniversary of the Catonsville Nine Actions (5/10)

In May of 1968, nine individuals shook the conscience of the nation as they burned U.S. Selective Service records with homemade napalm on the grounds of the Catonsville, Maryland Knights of Columbus hall. The fire they started erupted into an infamous trial and influenced similar dynamic actions across the country.

The UMBC community is invited to a Social Science Forum exploring this action, and the trial that followed, on Friday, May 10th, at 2:30 p.m. in the Proscenium Theater (Performing Arts and Humanities Building). Joining us will be a panel of scholars, activists and two members of the Catonsville Nine. The event, cosponsored by the Department of American Studies will feature a film screening (3:00 p.m.) and dialogue (4:30 p.m.).

For more information on the project and to hear a WYPR interview with organizer Theodore Gonzalves (chair of American Studies), see the BreakingGround blog.