Film Screening of Rocks in My Pockets, with Director Signe Baumane (10/22)

rimp09The Department of Visual Arts Visiting Artist Program presents a screening of the film Rocks in My Pockets (88 minutes), followed by a question and answer session with the director, Signe Baumane, on Thursday, October 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. at 132 Performing Arts and Humanities Building. Rocks in My Pockets is a poignant and often hilarious tale of mystery, mental health, redemption and survival, based on true events surrounding the filmmaker, the women in her family, and their battles with depression and madness.

Signe Baumane is an independent animator known for her controversial films on the subjects of sex, pregnancy, dentists and madness. Born in Latvia in 1964, she studied Philosophy at the University of Moscow and then began making animated films. In 1995, she moved to New York, working with Bill Plympton on several shorts and features. She continued producing her own short films in the USA, including Dentist(2005), Teat Beat of Sex (2007-2008), and Birth (2009). He sensual humor and bold feminism have made a mark in the independent animation world, most recently with her animated feature memior, Rocks in My Pockets, which has gathered awards and screening laurels at numerous festivals worldwide.

Admission is free. Complete information is available here.

LightCityU Information Session (10/12)

12004707_1630128543909170_1476213516687559568_nThe campus community is invited to attend an information session about the LightCityU Innovation Conference (March 28 – April 2, 2016) on Monday, October 12, at 2 pm at 331 The Commons. Light City team members will provide an overview of the concurrent Light City Baltimore festival as well as a request for proposals for LightCityU sessions.

UMBC will be the lead sponsor of LightCityU, a production of the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts (BOPA).

Premiering in 2016, Light City Baltimore will be the first large-scale, international light festival in the United States. Light City will provide a backdrop for the celebration of ideas, ingenuity and creativity through art, music and innovation. Light City will shine a light on Baltimore’s abundance of creative, cutting-edge, multi-disciplinary talent, and festival welcomes participants from across the globe. Light City’s innovation programming will generate an ecosystem of ideas and learning during the day — while lights, performances and live music reimagine the Inner Harbor at night.

LightCityU, Powering Social Change, is the Innovation Conference that will take place during Light City Baltimore. This dynamic event aims to be a catalyst for change by bringing together business innovators, thought-leaders and change-makers to explore the latest innovations and creative practices that will help us build a more responsible and equitable society.

LightCityU will explore six tracks in the first year:
1. Health Innovation: Advancements in how we take care of ourselves and our health.
2. EdTech: New uses for technological tools in learning.
3. Sustainability: Technologies and innovations that minimize our impact on the environment.
4. Social Enterprise: Businesses and organizations driving social change through innovation.
5. Creative Industries: Professional pursuits in advertising, digital marketing, media, wearables, mobile, augmented reality, virtual reality, gaming, design and more.
6. Makers: Innovations in DIY, next-gen manufacturing and engineering-oriented pursuits like electronics, robotics, and 3-D printing.

Information about the LightCityU RFP is here, with a submission deadline of Monday, October 19. General information about the Light City Baltimore festival is here. For additional information, please contact Tom Moore at tmoore@umbc.edu.

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in The New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, published October 6, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, examines the work of photographer Ishiuchi Miyako and her magisterial images of postwar Japan. “Ultimately, Ms. Ishiuchi’s photographs summon our compassion by asking us to acknowledge our shared vulnerabilities in a world we largely cannot control,” says Berger. “They appeal to our sense of empathy, our sense…that these images could apply to any one of us.”

Read “Photographing Japan, Through Shadows of the Past” and view the photographs at The New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column, which appears monthly on The New York Times website, is “a continuing exploration of the relationship of race to photographic portrayals of race.”

Bruk-Hoffmann Piano Duo (10/11)

brukhoffmannOn Sunday, October 11 at 3 pm in the Earl and Darielle Linehan Concert Hall, the Department of Music presents the Bruk-Hoffmann Piano Duo in concert, featuring the artistry of Karina Bruk and Paul Hoffmann. The duo will explore repertoire arranged for two pianos inspired by the star-crossed lovers, including:

• Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasia by Tchaikovsky (arranged by Karl Klindworth)
• Romeo and Juliet, Op. 64, by Sergei Prokofiev (arranged by Paul Hoffmann)
• Symphonic Dances from West Side Story by Leonard Bernstein (with percussionist Tom Goldstein) (arranged by John Musto)

The Bruk-Hoffmann Duo has performed two-piano concerts since 2005 in the United States and abroad, and performs annually at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University.The Duo performs annually at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University. Their most recent international appearances have been at the World Piano Conferences in 2014, 2011 and 2009 in Novi Sad, Serbia; at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria in 2012; and at the Händel Hause for the 2012 EuroArts Festival in Halle, Germany. They both have been appointed judges for the annual International Piano Competition of the World Piano Teachers Association.

Admission: $15 general, $10 seniors, $5 students, available through MissionTix. Tickets will also be available at the door, cash sales only. For additional information, visit here.

Spectrum: 2015 UMBC Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition (10/8 – 12/13)

cadvcfallOn Thursday, October 8, from 5 to 7 pm, the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture invites the campus community to the Opening Reception of Spectrum: 2105 Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition, featuring artworks by Lee Boot, Irene Chan, Kathy Marmor, Timothy Nohe, and Eric Smallwood.

The exhibition will open for regular hours on Friday, October 9, and will remain on display through December 13.

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located on the first floor of the Fine Arts Building. For more information, call 410-455-3188 or visit here.

Admission to the exhibition and opening reception is free.

Image: Timothy Nohe

Maurice Berger, CADVC, Latest “Race Story” in The New York Times

In the latest essay for his Race Stories column in The New York Times, published September 17, Maurice Berger, research professor at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, examines the work of photographer Marion Palfi and her relatively unknown photo book, There Is No More Time: An American Tragedy. “Juxtaposing portraits,” says Berger, “Ms. Palfi’s written observations and interview excerpts, There Is No More Time chronicles the many faces and viewpoints of white supremacy in Irwinton: the obedience to God and family; the religious and pseudoscientific justifications for believing that black people were inherently inferior; the resentment of outside intervention in the South’s racial affairs; and the determination to protect the legal authority of white people.”

Read “A Meditation on Race, in Shades of White” and view the photographs at The New York Times Lens blog.

Berger’s Race Stories column, which appears monthly on The New York Times website, is “a continuing exploration of the relationship of race to photographic portrayals of race.”