Eric Dyer, Visual Arts, in Two New York Exhibitions

Eric Dyer, Visual Arts, is featured in Wave & Particle, a group exhibition that celebrates Creative Capital’s fifteenth anniversary, at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York. The exhibition opened on Saturday, February 14 and will continue on display through March 21. More information is available by clicking here.

His work will also be featured in Moving Image New York, a group exhibition on display at the Waterfront Tunnel in Chelsea in New York, from March 5 through 8. Additional information about Moving Image is available by clicking here.

John Rennie Short, Public Policy, in The Conversation

In light of the recent significant snowfall across parts of the Northeast, School of Public Policy professor John Rennie Short wrote an article for The Conversation in which he analyzed the impact of climate change on extreme weather events.

John Rennie ShortIn referencing the 60 inches of snow that fell in 30 days on Boston and parts of the wider region, Short wrote: “This is the new normal for weather in the US. Global climate change increases the chances that the once-a-century event is now a once-every-twenty-years occurrence. The country is now experiencing more severe weather events: long droughts in the Southwest, destructive wildfires in the West, and more intense hurricanes along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.”

In his article, Short discussed urban planning and climate adaptation and the value of publicly funded services, among other topics.

“Immediately after a storm, there is public outcry for more and better emergency responses, but these priorities quickly move to the back of the line of government priorities as the event passes from memory. We are not good at using public monies for extreme, irregular events,” Short wrote. “Major weather events also expose the recurring dilemma of balancing public concerns with private interest. The shift of the past forty years towards private interests is embodied in the desire for small government, reducing taxation and shrinking the public sector.”

To read the full article titled “Extreme weather exposes the vulnerability of our cities to climate change,” click here.

Carlo DiClemente, Psychology, in the Baltimore Sun

In the wake of three hit-and-run accidents in the Baltimore region, the Baltimore Sun recently published an article addressing the question of what leads someone to flee an accident where another person may have suffered harm?

Carlo DiClemente

Psychology professor Carlo DiClemente was quoted in the article and discussed how alcohol, a factor in about 30 percent of traffic fatalities nationally, can amplify emotions of fear, shame, and guilt which overwhelm self-control.

“Rational decision-making is clearly difficult in an intoxicated state, particularly as blood-alcohol levels increase,” said DiClemente. “Fear and escape motivations kick in and, without good executive functioning, make flight more probable.”

DiClemente, who researches addictive behavior, was recently appointed to the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The council advises and makes recommendations to the U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) secretary, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) director on research program and policy matters in the field of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. For more information, click here.

To read the full article in the Baltimore Sun, click here.

Roy Meyers, Political Science, on WYPR’s Maryland Morning

On February 9, WYPR’s Maryland Morning hosted political science professor Roy Meyers to discuss education spending in Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s budget. Meyers discussed in-depth what K-12 education spending looks like for schools in the proposed budget.

Roy Meyers (UMBC)

“There are two kinds of cuts in the governor’s budget for all the counties and the cities across the board. One cut is the cut in the Geographic Cost of Education Index which under law he is allowed to make in his budget. That’s about $68 million in savings,” said Meyers. “The other savings, about $76 million, is in proposed changes to the law that allocates funds by formula to the 24 local school boards, and the legislature will have to agree to those cuts for those to go into place.”

Over the course of the discussion, Meyers commented on the history behind the Geographic Cost of Education Index (GCEI) and how the proposed education spending will affect Baltimore City schools, among other topics.

To listen to the full segment and to hear more in-depth analysis from Meyers, click here.

Michelle Stefano, American Studies, in City Paper

In a recent article published in the “City Folk” section of City Paper, Michelle Stefano, visiting assistant professor of American studies, wrote about Henry Reisinger, the longtime owner of E.M. Fenwick’s Choice Meats in Baltimore’s Cross Street Market.

Michelle StefanoStefano’s profile of Reisinger traces the history of the business and the hard work Reisinger has put into it for four decades. It also provides a glimpse into how the market business has changed in recent years.

“Reisinger tells of the old days, when there were six or seven meat vendors at the market. Now, there remains only Fenwick’s and his competition, Nunnally Bros., just down the path. ‘Unfortunately, we have a lot of empty businesses now,’ he laments, crediting the vacant stalls to the introduction of fast food in the 1980s, and the fact that ‘droves’ of workers from places like the shipyards off Key Highway are a lunchtime dream of the past. Camden Yards was full of businesses with employees patronizing the market—’now? It’s two stadiums,’ he says.”

To read more about Henry Reisinger in Stefano’s article titled “Henry Reisinger of E.M. Fenwick’s Choice Meats carves out a good life at Cross Street Market,” click here.

Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show hosted a panel discussion on February 9 on charter schools vs. traditional public schools, school closings, school funding, and the future of education.

Kimberly Moffitt

Kimberly Moffitt, an associate professor of American studies and a founding parent at the Baltimore Collegiate School For Boys, discussed her views on charter schools and the reason she decided to help found the Baltimore Collegiate School For Boys.

“Even as I’m someone who is at the table creating a charter school, I’m very cognizant of charter schools are not the panacea,” Moffitt said. “It was more about a mission that was very much tied to the academic research that I do that looks at what we have done in this country for young black males and the need to really focus educational opportunities for them in environments that help them thrive.”

Other panelists in the discussion included Jessica T. Shiller, professor of urban education at Towson University, Roni Ellington, associate professor of mathematics education at Morgan State University, and Bobbi Macdonald, executive director of the City Neighbors Foundation.

To listen to the full segment, click here.

Humanities Forum: There’s a Crack in Everything: That’s How the Light Gets In (3/4)

RaskowitzWednesday, March 4 | 7:00 p.m.
There is a Crack in Everything: That’s How the Light Gets in*
(*from Anthem by Leonard Cohen)
Michael Rakowitz, Professor, Art Theory & Practice, Northwestern University
Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Room 132

Artist Michael Rakowitz discusses his work, in the context of hope and antagonism, and at the intersection of problem solving and trouble-making. Rakowitz’s symbolic interventions in problematic urban situations extend from paraSITE (1998 – ongoing), in which the artist custom builds inflatable shelters for homeless people that attach to the exterior outtake vents of a building’s HVAC system, to Minaret (2001-Ongoing), in which access is gained to an architecturally-appropriate rooftop in a Western city and the Islamic call to prayer is sounded five times a day with the help of a megaphone for amplification. In Spoils (2011) Rakowitz made a culinary intervention at New York City’s Park Avenue restaurant by inviting diners to eat traditional Iraqi dishes on plates looted from Saddam Hussein’s personal collection. The project culminated in the repatriation of the former Iraqi President’s flatware to the Republic of Iraq at the behest of current Prime Minister Nuri Al Maliki on December 15, 2011, the date Coalition Forces left Iraq. In a related culinary-art project in Chicago, titled Enemy Kitchen (2012), Rakowitz devised a food truck that was manned by Iraqi War veterans working under Iraqi refugee chefs and served Iraqi cuisine to the public.

Michael Rakowitz is Professor of Art Theory and Practice at Northwestern University.  Born in New York  in 1973, Rakowitz is an Iraqi-American conceptual artist who works in a range of media to provoke discourse on contemporary politics. His solo exhibition, The worst condition is to pass under a sword which is not one’s own (2010), was exhibited at the Tate Modern, London. Another project, The Breakup, first presented at Al Ma’mal Foundation for Contemporary Art, Jerusalem in 2010, was exhibited at Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago in 2014. Rakowitz’s work  is featured in major private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Neue Galerie, Kassel, Germany; Smart Museum of Art, Chicago; Van Abbemuseum, Endhoven, Netherlands; British Museum; Kabul National Museum, Afghanistan; and UNESCO, Paris. Rakowitz is the recipient of a six prestigious awards from international foundations, most recently, a 2012 Louis Tiffany Foundation Award.

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities; the Visual Arts Department; the Center for Innovation, Research, and Creativity in the Arts; the Center for Arts, Design and Visual Culture; the American Studies Department; and the Modern Languages, Linguistics and Intercultural Communications Department.